Observations were stopped on June 27, 2019 when engineers placed DSCOVR in a safe hold mode due to issues with its attitude control system. ') This “safe hold” mode meant that DSCOVR was … It is at present unclear what the problem is, or whether they can recover the spacecraft.

... International Conference on advances in Satellite & Space … The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite is fully operational again, nine months after a technical glitch. DSCOVR’s history is packed with political shenanigans.

DSCOVR Public Release Statement. On 27 June 2019, DSCOVR was placed into a “safe hold” due to problems with the satellite’s attitude control system. Safe Hold is a gyroless control mode The DSCOVR Earth and space weather satellite is back online after a months-long glitch Elizabeth Howell. Leslie didn’t give a timetable for resuming normal operations of DSCOVR.
Deep Space Climate Observatory () (formerly known as Triana) was originally conceived in the late 1990s as a NASA Earth science mission that would provide a near continuous view of Earth and measure Earth’s complete albedo.The mission was canceled and the satellite was put into storage in 2001. It is at present unclear what the problem is, or whether they can recover the spacecraft.

Daily natural color imagery of Earth from the EPIC camera onboard the DSCOVR spacecraft. The solar wind monitoring satellite DSCOVR has gone into safe mode. } else { console.log ('nompuad'); document.write('') }Read More The solar wind monitoring satellite DSCOVR has gone into safe mode. DSCOVR has suffered a number of safeholds in the past, but those typically have lasted only a matter of hours.

NOAA and the USAF had DSCOVR removed from storage and …

3/8/2020. The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), formerly known as Triana, successfully launched on February 11th, 2015. Leslie didn’t give a timetable for resuming normal operations of DSCOVR. An Earth-observing satellite called DSCOVR has been stuck in safe mode for three months, and its operators finally have a plan to reboot it — but not for another few months. The Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, spacecraft went into a “safehold” June 27, interrupting its science observations from its perch at the Earth-sun L-1 Lagrange point, 1.5 million kilometers from the Earth in the direction of the sun. DSCOVR has suffered a number of safeholds in the past, but those typically have lasted only a matter of hours.


Engineers speculated that those earlier safeholds were caused by cosmic ray hits on spacecraft electronics. NOAA announed that DSCOVR, which went into safe mode in late June, had resumed operations.