As raging fires continue to sweep through the Amazon rainforest in Brazil, NASA satellites and astronauts aboard the International Space Station are tracking the flames from above. Fire Information for Resource Management System provides near real-time active fire data from MODIS and VIIRS to meet the needs of firefighters, scientists and users interested in monitoring fires. The 2019 Amazon rainforest wildfires season saw a year-to-year surge in fires occurring in the Amazon rainforest and Amazon biome within Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Peru during that year's Amazonian tropical dry season. NASA's ECOSTRESS Detects Amazon Fires from Space NASA's Ecosystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) captured imagery of fires in the Amazon regions of Brazil and Bolivia on Aug. 23, 2019. Scientists studying satellite image data from the fires in the Amazon rain forest said that most of the fires are burning on agricultural land where the forest had already been cleared. The town is located along BR-163, a straight north-south highway that connects farmers in the southern Amazon with an ocean-going port on the Amazon river in Santarém. The country has experienced record wildfires this year, and, as of August 23, has more than 2,500 active fires throughout the Amazon. Made with data collected from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite, the images map carbon monoxide at approximately 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) altitude.

The fire icons represent fires imaged by NASA's Terra satellite between Aug. 19 and 26.

Get the latest updates on NASA missions, watch NASA TV live, and learn about our quest to reveal the unknown and benefit all humankind. On August 19, 2019, the MODIS instrument on NASA’s Terra satellite captured a natural-color image (top of the page) that shows fires burning in the vicinity of Novo Progresso in the Brazilian state of Pará.

Even NASA … The smoke from the fires is so intense that Sao Paulo was plunged into darkness for about an hour on Monday afternoon, August 20, 2019.

"Amazon forests are quite vulnerable to fire, given the frequency of ignitions for deforestation and land management at the forest frontier, but we've never known the regional extent or frequency of these understory fires," said Doug Morton of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and the study's lead author. The Amazon rainforest is on fire.

ECOSTRESS captured the first image of the Amazon rainforest in Peru before the fires began, on Aug. 7. The Amazon fires were captured by the AIRS camera on the Aqua satellite. Users can subscribe to email alerts bases on their area of interest.

NASA.gov brings you the latest images, videos and news from America's space agency. ... And while the CO concentrations shown in the NASA map are … Fire data is available for download or can be viewed through a map interface.

Carbon monoxide associated with fires from the Amazon region in Brazil from August 8-22, 2019. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument aboard the Aqua satellite detects carbon monoxide high in the atmosphere from fires burning in Brazil's Amazon region.

A movie clip released by NASA shows a huge cloud of CO drifting across the continent. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument aboard the Aqua satellite detects carbon monoxide high in the atmosphere from fires burning in Brazil's Amazon region. It shows a surface temperature map revealing water-stressed and non-stressed forest (shown in brown and blue, respectively).

With the fire season in the Amazon approaching its midpoint, scientists using NASA satellites to track fire activity have confirmed an increase in the number and intensity of fires in the Brazilian Amazon in 2019, making it the most active fire year in that region since 2010.